Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day 2019

Pinhole images through a vortoscope: Is it a first?

Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day (WPPD) is celebrated annually on the last Sunday of April. For several years I’ve joined my friends in the Edinburgh Lo-Fi Photography Group for a pinhole photowalk and trying each year to do ‘something different’ with a light-tight space, some form of light-sensitive media and a very, very, small hole.

While the ultimate goal in celebrating the Day is to produce a single image that will be uploaded to the WPPD website, it is also a fun, social occasion with friends, a sharing of ideas, coffee, an interesting location, cake, pincam comparisons and inevitably food and drink in a pub or restaurant afterwards. To make the day interesting photographically I usually prepare several pincams and this year I carried three. My intention was to make one pre-planned image for WPPD19 and to simply have fun with the others to see how they turned out.

First was the ‘Not Just Any Belgian Collection Biscuit Tin’ pincam, then came the ‘All Butter Scottish Shortbread Collection Penta-pinhole’ pincam and finally, the ‘Olympus OM1n Vortoscopic Bodycap Pinhole’ pincam. Each will be explained below in some detail. (This will be a long blog post)!

The Not Just Any Belgian Collection Biscuit Tin pincam

Choose one pinhole from three … the lower landscape pinhole is uncovered

I last used this 90mm deep biscuit tin which holds a sheet of 10″x8″ paper, a few months ago while experimenting with SE1 emulsion on tracing paper. The success of that experiment was iffy at best but it did confirm the accuracy of the f/360 pinhole apertures (it has three to choose from) and the angles of view achievable. It seemed a safe bet to put it to use for WPPD19 loaded with a sheet of Harman Direct Positive Paper which would subsequently be developed in fresh Ilford Multigrade.

Our walk passed a large concrete arrow set in the grass. Apparently the arrow had served some purpose to the RAF during the second world war. It seemed an ideal subject for pinhole imagery. I set up the pincam on a high tripod, aiming downward and used the lower landscape pinhole so as to raise the horizon and include the shadow of the pincam in the image.

Using the lower landscape pinhole together with the pincam aimed downwards ensures the inclusion of the pincam’s shadow.

The All Butter Scottish Shortbread Collection Penta-pinhole pincam

The shutter is an old 5″x4″ darkslide fitted with high-density foam and magnets
Five pinholes concurrently uncovered to provide five overlapping image planes

Like the Belgian Biscuit tin, this pincam had been last used in my experiments with emulsion on tracing paper. It is much shallower at only 55mm and although very wide, the angle of view of each pinhole is insufficient to cover the 10″x8″ paper that fits inside the tin. By using multiple apertures light would be projected by the peripheral ones into the areas of the paper unexposed by the central one. This would also create the interesting idea of overlapping image planes.

The challenge would be to produce five near identical pinhole apertures. This would ensure evenly balanced exposures in the periphery while the central area would receive light from all five apertures. From experiments with three holes I reckoned I could meter the subject, divide by five and deduct that well-known pinhole unit of measure: the ‘bit’. I marked out and drilled holes in the tin lid. The f/160 pinhole apertures were created by pushing a dress-making pin part-way through squares of thin aluminium foil which were then measured for accuracy and consistency before attachement to the inside of the tin. Measurement was made by scanning each pinhole at 9600dpi, measuring onscreen at full size and comparing against the known measurement of a steel rule scanned and viewed at the same resolution and size.

steel rule vs pinhole. Scanned at 9600dpi and viewed on screen at full size, surprisingly accurate measurements can be made for consistency across several pinholes

The twist I wanted to put on the image made with this camera was based on the fact that the meeting point to start our walk was to be outside a theatre. Now the universal symbol for the theatrical arts is a mask and with the potential for the overlapping image produced by this pincam to ‘mask’ the subject, I thought I would take it a little further and make a mask for a member of our group to wear while posing for my WPPD19 image!

a simple papier-mache mask with a few splashes of acrylic paint

Unfortunately the person I had in mind (whose ‘big’ wild hair would have set off the mask very well) was unable to attend the meetup so I ended up wearing it myself and taking a selfie! I quite underestimated just how close the pincam to subject distance would need to be: this was taken at about 30cm – it really needed to be half that or even closer!

Not quite as intended – the jury’s out on whether this is worthy of WPPD19 submission.

The Olympus OM1n Vortoscopic Bodycap Pinhole pincam

It was while browsing my local craft store for mask materials that I spotted some 5cm square mirrors. Some years ago I had been introduced to vortographs, an interesting technique that once tried quickly found its way to the dark recesses of my memory. Something clicked and I decided it would be fun to make a vortoscope through which to make pinhole images. (A good starting point to learn about vortoscopism is https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alvin_Langdon_Coburn)

A vortoscope is a gadget that produces kaleidoscope-like images. It is made up of three (I guess it could be more) mirrors formed into a tube-like construction of triangular section which is placed over a lens (or in my case, over a pinhole aperture). The resulting image consists of a central direct section surrounded by peripheral reflections. The ‘diameter’ and length of the vortoscope affects the size and clarity of each of these sections and the abstraction of the image.

I made mine from a pack of 5cm square mirrors which I cut to size with a glass-cutter, a toilet roll core, copious amounts of hot-melt glue and some sticky-back foam. The bodycap has long been adapted for pinhole but to be sure I did re-make the pinhole aperture to the optimum 0.29mm for the 49mm projection distance when mounted on my old Olympus OM1n camera.

I was pretty pleased with the results. The camera was loaded with Kentmere 400 film from a bulk roll and subsequently developed in Ilfosol 3. I make no apology for showing all of the images here, warts and all, because I think they are quite cool! These have been scanned and slight adjustments made in Afinity Photo for exposure and levels. Most of the images were between half and one and a half stops underexposed which was probably down to my poor metering!

WPPD19: which image to submit?

At the time of writing, I have not yet decided which of all the pinhole images made on the day I should submit as my WPPD19 image. I’m open to suggestions.

Pinhole day this year was the first in a long time that I can remember having good, almost too good, weather for pinhole photography. It was unusual for me to come home with nothing I could call a failure!

The best thing about the day? Time spent with friends, sharing our enjoyment of simple image-making pleasures.

A final anecdote

We came across many bird watchers, apparently drawn to reports of two rare species of duck having been spotted along the coast where we were walking. Like us, each of them carried the tools of their hobby: while ours were tin cans and changing bags, theirs were tripods, spotting scopes and big digital cameras with huge long lenses surely capable of resolving the tail-feather detail of sparrows in flight at 1000 metres!

One of them was passing me when he spotted the Olympus round my neck: “Oh! What sort of lens is that? I’ve not seen one of these before.” he asked. Willing to be engaged in a spot of photographic gear talk I removed said ‘lens’ from the camera to show the pinhole end of the device. “It’s not a lens, it’s a vortoscopic bodycap pinhole.” I replied.

Oh dear! The clues were written all over his face. This conversation was going nowhere. It was quite clearly considered that I was some wacko with a screw loose! I need to invest time in the study of ornithology.

Remembering the past to discover the future

Rediscovering my mojo

Facebook does Memories. Depending on my activity in previous years Facebook will remind me that one year ago I did this or five years ago I did that. Generally I don’t share these memories but I like to be reminded of them and am sometimes surprised at how long it has been since the depicted memorable occasion.

In the past couple of weeks I’ve been reminded of photographic exploits and activities that I’ve found helpful in my present situation of coming to terms with retirement and in determining the direction I might take in my present photographic endeavours.

Three years ago I led a pinhole camera workshop. I’d volunteered in response to a request from the project leader of an organisation to a photographic club of which I was a member. I made plans for a two-day weekend workshop, starting with an explanation of how pinholes work through making pinhole cameras from recycled household containers to making images and developing prints. Unfortunately due to having to change venue the workshop had to be condensed into a single four-hour session! It took a lot more planning but we did it and had a great time in the process.

Just one year ago I was experimenting with what I called ‘timescapes’, moving a pinhole camera through the landscape during the exposure. The results, as is often the case with experimental work, were not quite what I was expecting yet held an appeal that I have yet to follow up on.

What those two Facebook Memories reminded me of was the period of time over which pinhole has been the focus of my photographic interest: I’ve been making pinhole cameras and images for nearly seven years! Reflecting on this, I realise that my subject matter has been quite consistently that of time expressed in the motion that a pinhole exposure renders in an interestingly and somewhat abstract, blurred fashion.

Right now I feel I am at a cross-roads and in need of some direction. Perhaps it’s a seven-year itch! Yet I still want to capture the motion of time passing, of time itself. For years I’ve used the motion of flowing water, of the movement of clouds in the sky and of plants and branches in the breeze to depict time. More recently I have discovered the expression of time in solid rock formed under geological forces over millennia and in tree trunks formed over decades and centuries as the tree has responded to changing light and seasons.

I see time too in human faces yet photographic portraiture is a genre that has never appealed to me. A portrait that has been drawn or painted resonates with me far more than does a photograph. Unfortunately I neither draw nor paint but I wonder whether there is some way to combine a photographic image with a drawing or painting, blurring the division between these arts to create some impressionistic time portrait. It’s something to be thinking about.

In reflecting on these ideas I may also have hit upon one of the factors at play in my adaptation to retired life. I worked in a seaside town, commuting daily forty or so miles each way. Each day I would find time to walk by the shore, usually during whatever lunch break I could take or either before or after the working day. I would escape from the noise and busy-ness of the day in the sound of the waves on the beach or against the rocks. I would often have a camera (not always of the pinhole variety!) with me and would instinctively make pleasing images that somehow matched the mood I would find myself in. Facebook, once again provided a memory, this from five years ago:

Now retired and living a long way from the shore, I realise that I am missing that communion with the sea and the world into which it transported me. Finding a way to return to it or to recreate it is also something to be thinking about.

Opening my inbox this morning has perhaps shown me a way forward Among the exhibitions listed in a regular email was one that immediately grabbed my interest. It has inspirational promise. A meeting is now arranged, a visit planned and my train ticket booked.

Let new adventures begin!

All change, Catch up, Carry on

A catch-up on the year’s photographic endeavours, somewhat disrupted by retirement.

My last blog was posted in March! Here’s what’s been going on: (Warning – It’s a long one!)

All change

The opportunity to retire came my way at the beginning of the year and having decided to accept it, the rest of the year has been taken up with preparation, the deed itself and now readjusting to the life of a retiree.

For the past twenty one years my sister and I have run a small optical practice in a quiet seaside town. The subject of our inevitable retirement and how we might bow out had been discussed off and on and we had a range of possible outcomes in mind. These ranged from one day having to shut the door and walk away, through the more likely scenario of being made a derisory offer with strings attached by one of the big groups, to the dream of someone walking in the door with an offer to buy and to pay the price we asked.

As it happens, dreams do come true! Somebody wanting to expand their existing single practice got to hear of our thoughts and in January I took a phone call that set the rest of the year in motion! A date for transfer of the business was set – 31st August. At first it seemed that we had plenty time to prepare but even by April it was already clear that time was running short! Indeed looking back, from then until the moment we handed over the keys was an uphill race against time, lawyers, surveyors and accountants. We were racing up a hill like lemmings and the cliff edge was 31st August when we would throw ourselves into the abyss of retirement.

Retirement too has been unexpected, at least so far. I can only describe it as a very weird time: After a couple of weeks I was ready to go back to work, as one would after a holiday, but I wasn’t on holiday. Six weeks into retirement I was still waking up at 5am to start my working day. By November I was feeling adjusted to some semblance of a new Monday to Friday routine but somehow I lost track of weekends. It was as if Saturday and Sunday didn’t exist! Even now at the end of December I can’t say I’ve yet settled fully into this new lifestyle.

The process has played havoc with the pursuit of my hobby but there have been occasions when I’ve been able to grab a camera for a brief fix of image making. Unfortunately I’ve had no time to indulge myself in the process of immersion in any one train of creative thought. Experiments haven’t been followed through, prints haven’t been made and consistency has gone out the window.

Catch up

So here’s what I’ve been up to when not preparing for or adjusting to retirement.

April

I managed a couple of outings on my bike with the Intrepid and of course I couldn’t miss Worldwide Pinhole Photography Day!

May

My other hobby is cycling. Somehow I found cycling an easier way to escape than photography. However, I’d acquired an e-bike with the intention of setting it up to do the donkey work of lugging my camera gear around!

June

Another cycle ride, this time to Queensferry to find images of the bridges across the Forth.

July

The present incumbent of the Office of President of the United States of America made a visit to the UK and spent a couple of days playing golf at one of his golf courses in Scotland. Donald Trump wasn’t particularly welcomed here. The media focussed on attempts by protestors to disrupt his golf but made little of several city-centre stopping demonstrations. I took my Vivitar v3800n SLR out, loaded with Kentmere 400 to record the mega-demo through the centre of Edinburgh, thoroughly enjoying a type of documentary photography I haven’t done for years!

August

My artist friend Oonagh has been mentioned in previous posts. We’d intended for months to meet up for Coffee, Cake and Cameras and I wasn’t going to miss the opportunity we had to do so in Anstruther at the beginning of August. I truly value any time spent in the company of creative people and Oonagh is no exception. We had a wonderful day each exploring in our own way, she with an underwater camera and a stereo pincam, and me with a Brownie 127 and Vest Pocket Kodak both loaded with cross process colour film and an experimental multi-coffee tin pincam.

Sadly my multi-coffee tin pincam experiment was a failure or perhaps it just worked differently from what I expected, so nothing to show from it. However, Oonagh brought me a present: A set of three 35mm film canister pincams, each with a magnet set in the lid to aid secure mounting on a metallic surface (I later found a tin lid that could be held in the QR mount of my tripod – perfect!)

contact printed paper negs – Oonagh’s filmcan pincams – views from Seafield Law

September

I met up with a group of friends to visit the SS Explorer at Leith Docks. Built as a research ship, it is one of the last surviving steam powered side trawlers still afloat and is being restored by a group of dedicated volunteers. We were privileged to have the opportunity to go on board and take photographs. I took Oonagh’s filmcan pincams loaded for paper negatives and my Vivitar v3800n loaded with Kentmere 400.


October

Just one photo outing this month, to capture some autumn colour with the Intrepid 4×5 on FP4+ black and white film 😉

November

Just one image this month, taken while out on an early morning cycle with one of Oonagh’s filmcan pincams.

scanned paper neg – Oonagh’s filmcan pincam – Murieston Trail

December

I’m beginning to put some thoughts together for photographic projects but my output so far kind of emphasises their experimental nature! I have but two paper negatives to show for my efforts so far but I’m working on it. This image was made in a biscuit tin pincam on 90gsm acid-free tracing paper coated with SE1 Emulsion. There’s a lot of perfecting to be done regarding my coating method and estimating exposures but my goal is to obtain a contact printable paper negative. That should be worth a few future blog posts!

scanned SE1 Emulsion on tracing paper negative – Biscuit tin pincam – Eliburn Reservoir

Carry on

My new life as a retiree is beginning to take shape and there is light ahead even if the tunnel is longer than I had expected.

I’ve taken up the noble retirement pursuit of Volunteering, in my case at the West Lothian Bike Library where I’m getting proper training as a bike mechanic and also as a led-ride leader. WLBL aims to make cycling available to all and has a wide range of adaptive bikes and trikes that are available to those with support needs. It also accepts donations of old bikes which are assessed and refurbished either for sale or for donation in response to requests from Social Services. A couple of days a week gives some structure, routine and purpose to my time in worthwhile activity.

There has been a gradual realisation that I can take an actual holiday. Or for that matter, as many or as much holidays as I can fit in! I can go day trips any day of the week. On my bike I’m restricted to a fairly limited area unless I take the bike somewhere on a train and as my wife doesn’t cycle, too many bike trips tends to selfishness. Of course, retirement gives us the time to spend together that was denied us when I was working. We had a chat, or two, or three about it and took a liking to the idea of a campervan …

… So after much internet browsing, asking about and looking around we’ve put down a deposit. Sometime soon we should be hitting the road in search of places of interest and potential campsites. The prospect beckons of being on location for sunrises and sunsets that I wouldn’t otherwise get to, cameras, bike, coffee and cake all ready to hand in the back of the van.

And so the blog, like life, will go on.

Working in a blackout

This blog is primarily about my film and emulsion-based expoits. In order to show the results of those exploits I have to scan the images and upload the resulting processed digital files to WordPress either directly or via Google Photos.

A few months ago I noticed that when viewing my blog on my laptop (a 2011 MacBook Air) some of my uploaded images appeared as totally black rectangles. Not just newly uploaded images but when I looked back through my blog, images which previously rendered as expected were displayed blacked out too.

I checked my blog on other devices: iMac, Windows PCs, iPhone and Android devices. All the images appeared correctly. I then checked how the same image files appeared on different online sites: Flickr, Facebook, Google Photos and Dropbox. When viewed on my MacBook Air, on all but Flickr the images appeared as expected but on Flickr the same files were blacked out. When viewed on other devices all the images appeared correctly.

The common factors among the failing files appears to be that they are scanned images, my MacBook Air, WordPress, Flickr and that the problem only began a few months ago. I’ve painstakingly reviewed my scanning and editing workflow to almost no avail.

I thought I’d cracked it when I scanned a set of black & white 35mm negatives last week:

  • Turn off all editing functions on my Epson Perfection 4990 Photo scanner.
  • Scan as 24-bit colour at 2400 dpi. Save images as .tif files on my 2009 iMac. (Iwould normally scan 16-bit grayscale to either 1200 or 2400 dpi .jpg files).
  • Open files in Affinity Photo, process as RAW files in Develop Persona, converting to black & white. Save as native .afphoto file.
  • Edit .afphoto file to spot, crop and straighten as necessary. Adjust black and white points in levels.
  • Export to .jpg files, resized to suit intended use. (For online, 1000 or 1200 pixels on longest side at 72 dpi).

Here are some of the resulting files that I uploaded both to Flickr and to WordPress:

I went to Flickr first and when viewed on my MacBook Air these images appear correctly. They were previously blacked out. The only change I had made was to scan as 24-bit colour files rather than 16-bit greyscale (which was previously my standard method). I was hopeful for my blog …

But here on my WordPress blog they remain blacked out. They appear correctly on other devices (iMac, Windows PC). I’m stumped. Did something change on my MacBook Air towards the end of last year? If so why does it only affect WordPress? Why only scanned images? There’s another thing too: it’s not just my images on my blog or on my Flickr account – I’m seeing the same thing on other blogs and other Flickr accounts. As far as I can tell it’s happening to scanned images and is only apparent on my MacBook Air.

Unfortunately my most used means of reading blog posts and updating Light Moments is via my MacBook Air. Until I can identify the problem and find a solution, my enjoyment of WordPress is being severely frustrated to the point of not maintaining my blog … at least for now.